Xchange Business Plan Competition

I have been playing a lot of chess in the past few months so I looked into making a chess AI. I found a tutorial online and went from there. The Official Chess Programming Wiki was most helpful. The code can be found here.

CLICK HERE TO PLAY MY CHESS AI!

Xchange Business Plan Competition

This application was created by myself and two friends. Xchange is food inventory management software for restaurants and grocers. Xchange leverages predictive analytics and machine learning in order to optimize orders by predicting invetory need based on past data. We entered this project into the Johns Hopkins University Business PLan Competition in 2019 and won third place in the general business category. Our repo can be found here.

Conserve.me Hackathon

This application tracks simple tasks (self-reported by user) that can improve environmental sustainability, like carpooling, taking shorter showers, and avoiding non-reusable water bottles. It also rewards the user for good (green) acts and punishes them for negative ones. There is a built in point system that calculates a users overall point value (Green Karma) based on their actions and adds it to their profile. These points are also analyzed over set time periods to allow the user to see their overall trends in waste and conservation, which will allow them to improve their overall efforts. Check out our devpost for more information! (This is an ongoing project that we are trying to convert to a full-fledged startup.)

JavaScript using p5 Processing Personal Project

This is one of my larger coding projects. I've ran through a lot of online tutorials and such when I learned how to use p5, so I'm counting that as a sort of project (all the programs I created during th learning process). Processing is a js project that using drawing tools on an html canvas. Its most advanced applications is data visualization through algorithmic programming. I talked about the project as an art form and the growing community behind it in one of my blog posts. As I mentioned, I have compiled my code into a Github repository that is open to the public. I also plan to mention larger portions of these code samples that better and more specifically demonstrate rthe potential and scope of the p5 project.

Object Oriented Chess Coursework

This was a group (of two) final project for my Freshman Intermediate Programming Course. It is written in Object Oriented C++ without the assistance of APIs. The game is playable in terminal and uses iostream graphics. The program includes clever save and load functions that allow for literally thousands of save files. You also have the option to set up your board any way you desire, so long as each color has only one king each. Castling is also supported. Unfortunately, since this is a school project (for some reason professors don't make new homeworks or projects), I am not able to make the code public due to academic ethics violations. However, if you are not a student who will need to take Intermediate programming at Hopkins, just email me, and I'd assume sharing the code with you would be appropriate. (My email is listed on the wite's homepage.) I can say that my partner and I received a 119/100, which I think may have been the highest score in the class.

Language Modeling using Trigrams Coursework

This was a particularly large assignment for a programming course. It is written in C and C++ (again without the help of any APIs. Users upload two plain text files, and the program parses everything into trigrams. It them uses the probability of third word occurences to generate a user designated number of sentences. I had a lot of fun playing around with this. A chapter or so of Nietzsche and the latest radio hit yielded the best results. Just like the previous project, since this is a university-related one, I am not able to make the code public due to academic ethics violations. However, if you are not a student who will need to take Intermediate programming at Hopkins, just email me, and I'd assume sharing the code with you would be appropriate. (My email is listed on the wite's homepage.) Why don't professors just make new assignments so we can all show off our code to employers/the public? It takes some of the fun out of things.

Python Web Crawlers Personal Project

Some of the most exciting things I did with programming (early on) was building web crawlers. Here are my favorites (using python 3 and Beautiful Soup). 1) Internship.com Crawler: I built this in my first semester of freshman year. Internships seemed increasingly important for CS majors, especialy at Hopkins where people are so competetive. I made this crawler to go through all availiable internship positions from Internship.com, one of the worlds largest internship posting sites. I liked it and used it so much, that I added in a filtering feature that allows you to select interships by major. I sent it to some of my friends, and they ended up using it too. I actually didn't choose an internship from this site, because I found a great fit at synoPTsis (listed towards the top of the page). 2) Reddit Hot Word: I built this crawler during my second semester of freshman year. Free time is extremely rare in college and even more so when you're an engineer. This crawler creawls through Reddit's front page and lists the most used word of the day. It was really fun to use around election season. The code for both crawlers can be found at these Github Repos: (1) and (2). I think python is a great intro to programming, and webcrawlers are a fun way to see the results of your work. (I still think the best intro to programming is JavaScript p5. See this blog post for more.)